Jack the Ripper

Friday, August 21, 2015

Protesters are getting ready to march again on the infamous Jack the Ripper museum near the Tower of London tomorrow.

The community came out in force with protesters from all walks of life packed solidly outside the controversial Jack the Ripper museum last night for its planned opening in Cable Street near the Tower of London.

Protesters gather this-evening outside 12 Cable Street near the Tower of London to picket against today’s opening of the Jack the Ripper Museum.

The launch of the controversial new Jack the Ripper museum opening near the Tower of London on Tuesday is being boycotted by the Mayor of Tower Hamlets because he says his local authority was “misled” in the original planning application.

Hundreds of protesters are expected to picket outside the new Jack the Ripper Museum opening in London’s East End next week.

The neighbours thought they were getting a museum in their street celebrating the achievement of heroines down the ages in London’s East End.

Private family snapshots have emerged for the first time showing the children of the latest suspect named as Jack the Ripper being exposed in a new TV documentary on Monday—more than a year after he was revealed exclusively in the East London Advertiser.

A fish’n’chip shop in London’s East End has had a traditional makeover and been turned into an historic memorial to the victims of Jack the Ripper—at the spot where the Victorian serial killer taunted police with a message chalked on a wall.

Jack the Ripper could be connected to Bram Stoker’s fictional horror character Dracula, according to a new theory emerging.

We will never ever know who Jack the Ripper was—but his spate of killings known as the Whitechapel Murders sparked mass social reform to rid London’s East End of its Victorian slums and deprivation.

A descendant of a police officer involved in the 1888 Whitechapel Murders opened Saturday’s session of a three-day Jack the Ripper convention in London’s East End marking the 125th anniversary of the “autumn of terror”.

A major Jack the Ripper convention is being staged in London’s East End where the Victorian serial killer stalked, marking the 125th anniversary of the Whitechapel Murders and their social impact on the deprived population.

A second woman has been found dead and mutilated tonight, within an hour of the latest Whitechapel Murder—this time in the City of London.

Cartherine Eddowes is one of the prostitutes who regularly walked Aldgate High Street waiting for City clients, but is kept on the move by police.

Scotland Yard sends in their top detective in the latest development in the Whitechapel Murders to take over the hunt for Annie Chapman’s brutal killing in a backyard at 29 Hanbury-street.

Annie Chapman’s inquest is opened on September 10, 1888, at the Working Lads’ Institute in the Whitechapel-road, opposite the London Hospital, by Middlesex coroner Wynne Baxter.

Horror strikes the East End of London again as yet another body of a murdered woman is found in the dead of night.

Lizzie Stride, known as ‘Long Liz’, wears a black jacket and skirt with a posy of a red rose in a spray of maidenhair fern leaves and a black crêpe bonnet the last time she is seen alive, on September 29, 1888.

Another mutilated body of a woman is found at 5.30am on September 8, 1888, in the back yard of a rooming house at 29 Hanbury-street—the second murder in nine days within a mile, the third in less than a month!

Annie Chapman has no money for lodging the night she dies, on September 8, 1888.

The first victim of Jack the Ripper, Mary Ann ‘Polly’ Nichols, the third of the Whitechapel Murders of 1888, is buried at the City of London cemetery in Manor Park today, September 6, 1888.

The murder of a prostitute on the dark landing of a tenement block in Whitechapel on the dawn after the August Bank Holiday, 1888, is reported in the East London Advertiser.

An historian delving into Jack the Ripper’s first known victim 125 years ago has raised £650 for a memorial to Britain’s worst civilian wartime disaster more than half-a-century after the Whitechapel Murders.

A woman was reported in The Pall Mall Gazette on September 4, 1888, as having been assaulted when she was threatened with a knife to her throat—close to where Polly Nichols had been slain.

The inquest into Polly Nichols’ brutal murder opens at 9am today, September 1, 1888, a day after her death, the hearing being heard at a packed Working Lads’ Institute in the Whitechapel-road, opposite the London Hospital.

The body of the woman Polly Nichols is found mutilated today at 3.30am, August 31, 1888, on the cobbled carriageway in front of a stable entrance at Essex Wharf in Buck’s-row, behind Whitechapel railway station.

Polly Nichols is seen alive for the last time at 2.30am in Osborn-street on August 31, 1888, disappearing round the corner eastward along the Whitechapel-road.

An identity parade held at the Tower of London on a bright August morning follows the murder of a prostitute in London’s shadowy East End.

Polly Nichols is to walk the streets of London’s East End for the last time tonight, August 30—before she is murdered in the early hours of the next morning.

Several books have been published this year to coincide with the 125th anniversary of the Whitechapel Murders.

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