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No trouble at the Mill

PUBLISHED: 17:00 17 July 2009 | UPDATED: 14:35 05 October 2010

A PIONEERING 1980s environmental art work featuring the plantation and harvesting of two acres of wheat fields in downtown New York is the inspiration behind a unique new project in Dalston. The Dalston Mill is a ground-breaking satellite venture by exper

A PIONEERING 1980s environmental art work featuring the plantation and harvesting of two acres of wheat fields in downtown New York is the inspiration behind a unique new project in Dalston.

The Dalston Mill is a ground-breaking satellite venture by experimental architectural collective, EXYZT, as part of Barbican Art Gallery's new exhibition Radical Nature: Art and Architecture for a Changing Planet.

The 16-metre-high temporary windmill structure will produce low-voltage electricity to create flour and bake bread, and will also host a packed programme of special performances, activities and events.

Highlights include performances of Arcola Youth Theatre's new production Kontakt, exploring the art of meaningful conversation.

Visitors can also indulge in the insights of urban psychoanalyst Laurence Petit and delight in cake decorating and bread making with a background of pedal-powered music with Magnificent Revolution.

Of course, the main feature will be a restaging of Agnes Denes's Wheatfield - A Confrontation, 1982, as the transplantation of rural nature at the centre of a dense urban environment transforms this disused space in the heart of Dalston.

The Dalston Mill is located next to the Peace Mural in Dalston Lane, between Ashwin Street and Hartwell Street. It is open daily between 2 and 10pm. Admission is free. Radical Nature: Art and Architecture for a Changing Planet 1969-2009 is showing at the Barbican Art Gallery until October 18.


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