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Devil May Cry 4

PUBLISHED: 11:16 10 March 2008 | UPDATED: 13:06 05 October 2010

Publisher: Capcom
Price: £39.99
Format: Xbox 360 (also available on PS3)
AGE RATING: 16+

Humorous, inventive and over-spilling with action, Devil May Cry 4 is

Publisher: Capcom
Price: £39.99
Format: Xbox 360 (also available on PS3)
AGE RATING: 16+

Humorous, inventive and over-spilling with action, Devil May Cry 4 is dazzling in both its ambition and achievements. From the moment you pick up a controller and begin to play it immerses you in a supernatural world full of demonic beasts, ten-foot swords that bark like chainsaws and some of the best arcade fighting ever to grace a console.
Equipped with an infinite supply of bullets and a fearsome array of weapons, there's a never-ending stream of demons to slay in ever more inventive and hilarious ways.
For the first half of the game you step into the demonslaying shoes of Nero, a cocksure apprentice who quickly comes to blows with Dante, the half-demon hero of the first three Devil May Cry games. Nero is no pushover, though, as he's equipped with a sword that can unleash a huge number of special attacks and a demonically-powered hand that can toss adversaries around like rag dolls. It's great fun learning his full repertoire of moves as he slashes his way through demonic hordes and it's almost a disappointment when Dante becomes playable for the second half of the game.
It's the game's fighting system that's the real star of the show. At first you'll be using simple button combinations to hack, slash, dodge and gun your way through a level, but as the game progresses so more combination attacks become available. Over time you'll learn to string these together for more hard-hitting moves that'll amaze novice players and satisfy veterans. With split-second timing you'll soon be launching unbelievable combos, smashing an enemy into the air, leaping up after them with your sword, slamming them back to the ground in a wrestling hold and then throwing them into a group of other beasts while strafing them with gunfire.
Demons don't die easy and they all attack in set and learnable ways which makes purchasing new moves at the end of each level vital. The more you get used to the deceptively simple controls, the more you'll start using your own combinations to accomplish more technically impressive feats.
There are simple puzzles to solve and a stunning world to explore, but it's really all about battling a series of demonic terrors with as much panache as your blurring fingers can manage. This is no simple cookie cutter sequel but a honing and sharpening of all the best elements from the previous games in the series to create an action title that borders on the sublime, then somersaults over it, guns blazing.

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