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Bow Creek raily' does have a rare orange-beak Water Rail bird

PUBLISHED: 23:48 01 December 2008 | UPDATED: 13:51 05 October 2010

(en el telescopio) Andrea Mcantosh

(en el telescopio) Andrea Mcantosh

WILDLIFE enthusiasts have been braving the British weather with their cameras to capture some of the diverse species nestling along East London's unique 26-mile nature corridor' along the River Lea. But it was worth it—they snapped London's rarely-spotted, orange-beak water rail bird (pictured)

Else Kvist

WILDLIFE enthusiasts have been braving the British weather with their cameras to capture some of the diverse species nestling along East London’s unique 26-mile nature corridor’ along the River Lea.

But it was worth it—they snapped London’s rarely-spotted, orange-beak water rail bird (pictured).

Even Advertiser photographer Carmen Valino, who accompanied them, managed to capture it on camera.

Guided walks have been laid on along the banks of Bow Creek and the East India Dock Basin by a biodiversity team from Lee Valley Regional Park authority.

The enthusiasts have been getting the low-down from the experts like biodiversity manager Simon Wightman about the battle to preserve East London’s natural wildlife diversity from encroaching urban development.

“The walkers had to endure the torrential downpour,” he said. “But they got a real treat, seeing a water rail nestling in a wall.”

The water rail walked the full length of the dock right in front of the snappers.

The group also saw 150 teals, 10 redshanks and 30 tufted ducks, as well as a shelduck.

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