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Bow student conquers Man v Coast event in aid of Help Refugees charity

PUBLISHED: 09:00 13 July 2018

Bow student Nina Clifton, 26, completed the first ever �Man v Coast� charity event in Cornwall. Pic: Rat Race Adventure Sports

Bow student Nina Clifton, 26, completed the first ever �Man v Coast� charity event in Cornwall. Pic: Rat Race Adventure Sports

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A student has conquered a gruelling coastal swimming, running and cliff-jumping race raising funds for refugees.

Full-time masters student Nina said she was thrilled to have crossed the finish line in a time of eight hours and four minutes -  the furthest she�s ever run in her life. Pic: Martyn WarwickFull-time masters student Nina said she was thrilled to have crossed the finish line in a time of eight hours and four minutes - the furthest she�s ever run in her life. Pic: Martyn Warwick

Nina Clifton – who lives in Tredegar Road, Bow – was thrilled to cross the finishing line at the first Man v Coast event which saw 639 competitors swim, climb and scramble along a 25 mile stretch of the Cornish coast.

The 26-year-old said: “When I first signed up, my friends thought I’d gone mad. I didn’t really know what coasteering even was.

“The most I’d ever run before was 18 miles during a training run. The hilly coastline of Cornwall was certainly a bit different to the parks of London.

“My legs have felt better, that’s for sure. It was very tough,” a triumphant Nina said.

Competitors made their way from St Michael’s Mount to Land’s End in an event organised by firm Rat Race Adventure Sports.

Queen Mary University masters student Nina crossed the finish line in eight hours four minutes.

Nina – who hiked in the Lake District and Yorkshire Dales training between studies – now wants to do Rat Race’s Man v Mountain event in Snowdonia this September.

By braving the pain barrier, Nina has so far raised £550 for charity Help Refugees.

Nina, who studies child refugees, said: “Many millions of people have been displaced.

“The journey to safety is often dangerous. Many people are forced to live in camps, struggling with little or no personal possessions, less than adequate quantities of food, and risks of ill-health.

“Working to fill a huge gap in support, Help Refugees collaborate with groups across Europe and the Middle East to help those in need. This may mean providing food, clothing, shelter, funding and more.

There’s also a personal reason why Nina - who has volunteered with charity Friends of Refugees - is so passionate about the cause.

She said: “My grandpa had to flee Poland with his family in the Second World War.

“The world is so connected, through families, through friends, through trade. We’re all just like each other, and it’s so important to remember that.

“We all deserve dignity and hope, and to be treated with humanity and respect.”


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