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Limehouse church's 'sponsor a pane' appeal to raise window restoration funds

PUBLISHED: 07:00 05 June 2019 | UPDATED: 07:53 05 June 2019

Rector Richard Bray in front of the glass window. Picture: Ken Mears

Rector Richard Bray in front of the glass window. Picture: Ken Mears

Archant

A church is inviting people to sponsor a pane of its great glass window as it attempts to raise £100,000 to restore it.

St Anne's Church, Limehouse. Picture: Ken MearsSt Anne's Church, Limehouse. Picture: Ken Mears

The window in St Anne's Church, Limehouse, is more than 150 years old.

It avoided significant bomb damage during the First and Second World Wars but over the years, the lead in the intricate design has moved.

Many of the pieces of glass have cracked, with some in danger of falling out.

Now the church's supporters group, Care for St Anne's, has launched the sponsor a pane appeal after being told it will cost around £100,000 to restore the window to its former glory.

The glass window at St Anne's Church, Limehouse, which is in need of restoration. Picture: Imogen RadfordThe glass window at St Anne's Church, Limehouse, which is in need of restoration. Picture: Imogen Radford

With some grant funding already in place, the appeal itself will need to raise £40,000 towards the total figure.

So far, £7,000 has been raised thanks to the Limehouse history evening, which was held at the church and hosted by the Limehouse Community Forum.

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Rev Richard Bray, Rector of St Anne's, said: "The window is badly in need of attention.

"We are thrilled that this appeal has had such a strong start but there is a long way to go yet, so we'd like to invite people to sponsor a part of the picture so that this huge window can be brought back to its best."

Sponsorship of £30 will contribute towards the window's backgroud, while larger donations will go towards more prominent elements of the design.

The window was produced by Charles Edmund Clutterbuck, a Stratford-based glass artist, and depicts the crucifixion of Jesus.

Formed from enamelled rather than stained glass, Clutterbuck's design includes disciples, bystanders and Roman soldiers among the crowd, with hills and city walls seen behind the main figures.

It was installed following a fire at the Commercial Road church in 1850, which destroyed the previous window - a depiction of the sermon on the mount created by Benjamin West 40 years earlier.

The Grade I church itself dates from 1730, with the window appeal part of a wider attempt to fully restore the church and make accessibility improvements by the time of its 300th anniversary.

For more information and to sponsor a pane, visit stanneslimehouse.org/restoration/window

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