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It takes a giant crane to plant half-tonne tree on top floor of Bishopsgate office tower

PUBLISHED: 13:55 04 April 2019

Problem... how to plant a half-tonne tree at the top of this Bishopsgate office tower. Picture: Google

Problem... how to plant a half-tonne tree at the top of this Bishopsgate office tower. Picture: Google

Google

The problem of planting a half-tonne tree on the very top floor of a Bishopsgate office tower block was solved when arboreal engineers brought in a giant crane to hoist it into place.

Heave-ho... arboreal team ready to plant the Ficus Benjamina. Picture: UncommonHeave-ho... arboreal team ready to plant the Ficus Benjamina. Picture: Uncommon

The live 15ft Ficus Benjamina species was lowed through the roof of a new commercial rental building opposite Liverpool Street station.

The operation to lift it to the top floor as an eco-friendly centrepiece for the workspace was carried out when most offices in the area were closed on Saturday.

The tree which is native to Asia and Australia can reach 90ft in natural conditions, but is having to be specially ‘cultivated’ to make sure it remains a healthy size in the enclosed office surroundings.

Giant telescope crane hoisting the 15ft beast. Picture: UncommonGiant telescope crane hoisting the 15ft beast. Picture: Uncommon

The cylinder-shaped Crosspoint tower next to St Botolph’s Church was taken over from Lord Sugar’s development company by the Uncommon ‘healthy environment’ workspace lettings organisation.

Some 500 plants are being put in to help filter the air and provide a more natural office environment.

Uncommon’s founder and interior designer Tania Adir said: “The building has an abundance of natural light.

What the tree might look like when the top floor of the tower opens in the summer. Picture: UncommonWhat the tree might look like when the top floor of the tower opens in the summer. Picture: Uncommon

“It’s a breath of fresh air in the office rental industry.”

The 41,000sq ft ‘flexible office’ development in Liverpool Street is partly open with the first few tenants which include financial companies, start-up enterprises, charities and individuals renting office space.

Only the top floors where the tree was lowered has yet to be completed.

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