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Met Police step up patrols to tackle rise in Islamophobia and anti-Semitism

PUBLISHED: 15:54 07 September 2015 | UPDATED: 15:57 07 September 2015

Police Commander Mak Chishty [inset] gives assurance after rise in 'hate crime' reporting

Police Commander Mak Chishty [inset] gives assurance after rise in 'hate crime' reporting

MPS

Islamophobic reported offences have risen by more than 70 per cent in the past 12 months, Scotland Yard revealed today.

More than 800 offences have been reported to police across London in the 12 months to July, compared to 478 the year before.

The increase is largely put down to victims now more willing to go to the authorities with allegations of ‘hate’ crime, while the Met Police now admits its staff are more aware about identifying such offences.

“No-one should suffer in silence,” Met Commander Mak Chishty said. “We won’t tolerate hate crime and will take action to investigate all allegations and arrest offenders.

“Victims of hate crime will be taken seriously by the police.”

World events can influence a rise in hate crime, police fear. So can High Holy days due to increased numbers of visibly Muslims and Jews travelling to and from place of worship.

Today’s figures come in the run-up to the Jewish New Year this weekend, with police ready to carry out ‘high visibility’ patrols.

Figures for the East End, with its high ratio of Muslims in the population, show 40 Islamophic incidents reported in the Met’s Tower Hamlets division, just one more than last year—but anti-Semitic incidents shot up to 18 from only four a year ago.

A Scotland Yard spokesman said: “We know communities feel anxious in light of recent world events. So Neighbourhood policing teams are showing more presence on school routes, on holy days and prayer times to give reassurance.”

Police are in talks with synagogues, mosques and other faith communities. They are also working with organisations such as the Community Security Trust which tackles anti-Semitism and Tellmama for Islamophobic incidents.

The Met has 900 specialist officers in its Community Safety units specialising in religious and ethnic hate crime.


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