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Criminals get no hiding place' under the arches

PUBLISHED: 20:18 11 August 2008 | UPDATED: 13:30 05 October 2010

Old railway arches (above) transformed into revamped station entrance (top)

Old railway arches (above) transformed into revamped station entrance (top)

POLICE are stepping up patrols on the London Underground and DLR with new neighbourhood squads to give criminals no hiding place.' Some stations are being opened up like Shadwell on the DLR where Transport for London has just completed a revamp to get rid of dark and dingy corridors where passengers have felt unsafe

Mike Brooke

POLICE are stepping up patrols on the London Underground and DLR with new neighbourhood squads to give criminals no hiding place.’

Some stations are being opened up like Shadwell on the DLR where Transport for London has just completed a revamp to get rid of dark and dingy corridors where passengers have felt unsafe.

Figures out this week claim crime at Shadwell has almost vanished as a result.

Meanwhile, some 30 neighbourhood policing’ teams are being deployed on London’s rail network, backed by a 24-hour response team, patrolling trains as well as stations to create a feel safe’ visible presence for passengers.

Transport Police Chief Ian Johnston said: “The teams are tackling crime and the type of behavior that may not be criminal, but which makes people feel unsafe.”

His officers are going on regular patrols, running target’ operations and even holding public meetings to identify local needs and priorities, especially tackling assaults on staff and dealing with anti-social behavior.

A solution at Shadwell was opening up the entrance under the arches off Cable Street, which has seen crime drop since its dark and dingy corridor was transformed into “a bright open space” in May.

There has been just one crime reported at the station in three months, says City Hall, compared to six incidents between May and June last year.

Mayor Boris Johnson said this week: “Shadwell is an example of giving criminals nowhere to hide.

“Before, it was difficult to see anyone lingering in corners.”

Police targeted youths getting off the DLR at Shadwell last month in a search for anyone carrying knives—and yielded nothing.

The upgrading’ includes better lighting, converting an adjoining railway arch into an internet café, moving a newsagent’s to a more prominent location, installing public art and a new lock-up for 12 bicycles for the 16,000 passengers using Shadwell each day.

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