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Desperate women walk from Brick Lane to Buckingham Palace

PUBLISHED: 08:00 27 June 2010 | UPDATED: 16:12 05 October 2010

THIRTY women are walking to Buckingham Palace from London’s deprived East End to raise cash to help end their isolation. The Heba project in Spitalfields, which gives isolated women a way into the community, has run out of cash since the recession

By Mike Brooke

THIRTY women are walking to Buckingham Palace this morning from London’s deprived East End to raise cash to help end their isolation.

The Heba project in Spitalfields, which gives isolated women a way into the community through job training and language lessons, has run out of cash since the recession closed down the City Fringe Partnership which has been funding them for three years.

So its members are go on a sponsored walk at 10am from Brick lane to Buckingham Palace to launch their own fundraising campaign.

“We will meet at 9.30am first for a cup of tea to get our strength up first,” said the Heba centre’s co-ordinator Ann Wilding. “We need an emergency £200,000 just to survive.

“Today’s target is £7,000. That won’t get us far, but it will symbolise our desperate financial situation.”

They expect to arrive at the Palace about 1pm and plan a picnic lunch in St James’s Park.

The route takes in Tower Bridge and the sites along the Thames. Women are hoping sponsors will go on the Big Give website and type Heba’ in the search bar.


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