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Donor service wants blood from London's ethnic East End

PUBLISHED: 14:47 20 October 2008 | UPDATED: 13:42 05 October 2010

A SEARCH has begun for everyday people' who have received blood to come forward and tell their stories and become media stars.' A campaign by the National Blood Service wants to encourage Black and Asian volunteers to become donors and help solve the shortage for rare blood types in their communities in areas like London's East End

A SEARCH has begun for everyday people’ who have received blood to come forward and tell their stories and become media stars.

A campaign by the National Blood Service wants to encourage Black and Asian volunteers to become donors and help solve the shortage for rare blood types in their communities in areas like London’s East End.

Those who want to share their experiences and tell how receiving blood has helped change their lives will front the campaign with their picture and interview on leaflets distributed in their community, in the press and online as well as their story told on radio.

Only three per cent of active donors comes from these ethnic communities, statistics reveal.

Particular types of rare blood groups found only in Black and Asian communities are in short supply, campaigners point out.

Sufferers of Thalassaemia, a debilitating blood disease prevalent in South Asian communities, for example, need regular transfusions.

So do those with Sickle Cell Anaemia, which is common in the African and Caribbean communities.

There’s also a great need for blood for day-to-day use, including childbirth at hospitals that serve Black and Asian communities.

There are around 285,000 registered potential bone marrow donors on the British Bone Marrow Registry—but only three per cent are from ethnic minorities.

So the Blood Service is looking for people to become ambassadors’ or to become donors to call 020-7326 5979, or email:

Rina@livity.co.uk

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