Search

Kids learn about snot, sick and scabs at Queen Mary’s 5th science festival

PUBLISHED: 07:00 17 July 2015 | UPDATED: 08:20 17 July 2015

Ugh! studying the 'green stuff' at Queen Mary's science festival... [photos: Ray Crundwell]

Ugh! studying the 'green stuff' at Queen Mary's science festival... [photos: Ray Crundwell]

Ray Crundwell www.raycrundwell.com

Hundreds of schoolchildren from all over London flocked to the fifth Queen Mary University science festival in Whitechapel to learn about—things like snot!

...but it's fun pouring it out to test its consistency...but it's fun pouring it out to test its consistency

Body fluids such as mucus are among different substances studied in medical science, the youngsters discovered.

Pupils from Bethnal Green’s Hague Primary were among youngsters from London schools who came to hear fun talks on snot, sick and scabs from Queen Mary’s team at Whitechapel’s Centre of the Cell.

Other schools included Compass Secondary in Bermondsey, Heartlands High in Wood Green, Forty Hill Primary in Enfield and Epping St John’s Secondary.

Now to compare snot with sick...Now to compare snot with sick...

They were also given a crash course in the Higgs Boson particle, one of the most important scientific discoveries of our time.

“We were able to bring together scientists from a range of backgrounds to help explain everything from hearts to snot and the Higgs Boson,” festival organiser Jane Batchelor explained.

“The festival was an opportunity to demonstrate the research at the university while giving the kids a chance to ask the scientists involved in the work questions about science, which hopefully inspired them at the same time.

It's a 'micro' world out there for young scientists of the future to studyIt's a 'micro' world out there for young scientists of the future to study

“The demonstrations and displays captured the imagination of all the schoolchildren who came and even the adults, too.”

The children found out why some bees become queens and some become workers—it’s to do with a special jelly they eat, university boffins revealed.

They also learned how to become a particle physicist with Lego blocks and why zebra fish can teach us about the way we behave.

Pupils hang on every word of Queen Mary's boffins at the Centre of the CellPupils hang on every word of Queen Mary's boffins at the Centre of the Cell

The annual festival at the Centre if the Cell celebrates science and medicine in all forms, aimed at inspiring the next generation of young scientists.


If you value what this story gives you, please consider supporting the East London Advertiser. Click the link in the orange box above for details.

Become a supporter

This newspaper has been a central part of community life for many years. Our industry faces testing times, which is why we're asking for your support. Every contribution will help us continue to produce local journalism that makes a measurable difference to our community.

Latest from the East London Advertiser