Shakespeare theatre archaeologists plan Shoreditch walks in footsteps of The Bard

2008... Archaeologist on the original dig at Shakespeare's first 'Theatre' playhouse in Shoreditch

2008... Archaeologist on the original dig at Shakespeare's first 'Theatre' playhouse in Shoreditch - Credit: Museum of London

Archaeologists preparing more excavations of Shakespeare’s Curtain Theatre in Shoreditch after eight years are holding a season of public lectures and walking tours from the end of the month.

2008... Archaeologist on the original dig at Shakespeare's first 'Theatre' playhouse in Shoreditch

2008... Archaeologist on the original dig at Shakespeare's first 'Theatre' playhouse in Shoreditch - Credit: Museum of London

Experts are to share their knowledge about the early modern theatrical scene, Elizabethan London, the “rogues and villains” of Shoreditch theatres and eating and drinking in Shakespeare’s theatreland.

“The Curtain is one of Shakespeare’s least-documented theatres,” Museum of London archaeologists’ project manager David Divers said.

“So there is potential for our excavations to reveal more about Elizabethan theatre, life in Shoreditch in the late 16th and early 17th centuries and perhaps even the Bard himself.”

The events give an insight into the past about the first theatre district and an historically-significant site at the heart of Shoreditch.

The excavations, following previous digs nearby at Shakespeare’s original ‘Theatre’ playhouse started eight years ago, are part of the ‘Shoreditch Stage’ development where Elizabethan foundations have been uncovered by Museum of London Archaeology specialists.

The tour season runs from March 31 to May 25, part of the 400th anniversary commemoration of The Bard’s death.