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Poplar Job Centre to move to make way for 84 flats

PUBLISHED: 17:00 10 November 2020

The Job Centre will move from Dod Street to Mansell Street. Picture: Google Maps

The Job Centre will move from Dod Street to Mansell Street. Picture: Google Maps

Archant

Poplar Job Centre is set to be demolished to make way for dozens of new flats.

An artist's impression of the proposed flats for Dod Street. Picture: Telereal Investment Properties LimitedAn artist's impression of the proposed flats for Dod Street. Picture: Telereal Investment Properties Limited

Last week Tower Hamlets councillors unanimously passed plans to tear down the office block in Dod Street, which is currently used by the Department for Work and Pensions.

It is set to be replaced by 84 homes – 23 of them affordable - made up of a six-storey and an eight-storey block fronting the Limehouse Cut. They will be linked by a four-storey building plus basement car parking.

The Job Centre is being relocated two miles away to Mansell Street, Tower Hamlets’ development committee heard on Thursday.

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Planning officers, who recommended the proposals for approval, said the offices were no longer fit for purpose and have poor transport links.

“In its current state, the office accommodation is unsuitable compromised office space, and this is further compounded by its location within a predominately residential area,” the committee heard.

The new development by Telereal Investment Properties Limited received 10 objections from residents living in Ancora House, Thomas Road, Dod Street and Aspen Court care home. The Burdett Wharf Tenants and Residents Association also said they were against the plans.

Tufyal Chowdhury, who lives nearby, said one of the residents associations was made of 85 residents, who all objected to the scale and size of the development and how it would fit into the local area.

“We do welcome the development in principle and recognise the need for housing in this area,” he told the committee. “My objection isn’t to development but to the size and scale. It will have a major impact on the light I have in my home.”

However planning officers said they have “outlined any potential adverse impacts on neighbours and are satisfied that these are not significant to warrant refusal, taking into consideration the public benefits of the scheme such as the provision of new housing and enhanced public realm”.


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