Hawksmoor’s Limehouse church gets disabled access after 280 years

Hawksmoor's baroque tower of St Anne's Limehouse

Hawksmoor's baroque tower of St Anne's Limehouse - Credit: Archant

Work has begun on a first-phase to install disabled access at Limehouse parish church for the first time in its 270-year history.

Plaque to Nicholas Hawksmoor who designed the baroque St Anne's

Plaque to Nicholas Hawksmoor who designed the baroque St Anne's - Credit: Archant

Most of the £44,000 has been raised by members of St Anne’s congregation in London’s deprived East End, with events like push-chair rallies.

Ramps are being installed, as well as new toilets and a storage area for the mother-and-toddler group to replace their old store-room where a future lift-shaft is to be installed.

The fundraising includes a £10,000 top-up from Tower Hamlets council’s special fund for improving the East End’s houses of worship.

Phase 2 begins next summer when the listed Nicholas Hawksmoor church consecrated in 1730 installs a lift for wheelchair and other disabled members to reach the worship area on the first-floor. It is costing an additional £20,000 which the congregation must now raise.


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