Search

Health care moved on to the sick list in East End

PUBLISHED: 16:31 17 October 2008 | UPDATED: 13:42 05 October 2010

THE quality of hospital care in the East End is at its worst in two years with the Royal London struggling to meet government standards, according to the healthcare watchdog. Too many patients across the borough are waiting more than 26 weeks to be admi

THE quality of hospital care in the East End is at its worst in two years with the Royal London struggling to meet government standards, according to the healthcare watchdog.

Too many patients across the borough are waiting more than 26 weeks to be admitted to hospital and are waiting too long to be diagnosed.

While many are having to wait more than the government target of 18 weeks to be treated at the Whitechapel hospital after being referred by their GP.

In the most recent health check by the Healthcare Commission, Barts and the London Trust which runs the Royal London, was given a rating of `fair' for its quality of services after being judged as `excellent' for two years running.

The survey revealed the trust is on course to fail four out of 10 of the government's new targets which include slashing MRSA rates and reducing mortality rates from heart disease and strokes.

But it was not all doom and gloom, with the trust being given a clear bill of health for its safety and cleanliness, dignity and respect, standard of care and keeping the public healthy.

And it maintained its 'good' rating for managing its money well.

The trust's chief executive Julian Nettel admits the failure to meet all of the governement's targets has let them down.

He said: "This year's rating reflects the importance of meeting access targets as an integral part of our service.

"These are given a high weighting within the overall score, contributing to our new rating from 'excellent' to 'fair'.

"We remain committed to improving access to our services and have implemented measures to ensure delivery of the targets."

Tower Hamlets Primary Care Trust also dropped from last year's `good' score to `fair' for its quality of services.

The survey revealed that East Enders are still not able to see a doctor within 48 hours and the trust is not meeting its breast screening targets, despite its recent campaign.

But the PCT achieved the highest possible ratings on safety and cleanliness, and good management and received a score of `good' for the way it manages its money.

PCT's chief executive, Alwen Williams, insists that all of the borough's GP practices are now offering more appointments and health bosses have more plans and investment in place to ensure improvements.

The report revealed that London is falling behind the rest of England when it comes to making improvements to its services with 20 trusts in London falling in their quality of services rating.

Most Read

Most Read

Latest from the East London Advertiser

Hot Jobs

Show Job Lists