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HMS Belfast’s D-Day bombardment is re-enacted 64 years on

PUBLISHED: 17:40 04 June 2008 | UPDATED: 13:20 05 October 2010

Re-enacting D-Day landings on the Thames this week

Re-enacting D-Day landings on the Thames this week

THE DRAMA of the Allied D-Day Landings was recreated on the Thames on one of the ships which took part in the action. Tourists visiting HMS Belfast, the Royal Navy’s floating museum moored permanently opposite the Tower of London, had the chance to fire 4ins guns at the weekend which were crucial in warding off enemy attack as Allied troops disembarked from the ship on the Normandy Beaches in on June 6, 1944

THE DRAMA of the Allied D-Day Landings was recreated on the Thames on one of the ships which took part in the action.

Tourists visiting HMS Belfast, the Royal Navy's floating museum moored permanently opposite the Tower of London, had the chance to fire 4ins guns at the weekend which were crucial in warding off enemy attack as Allied troops disembarked from the ship on the Normandy Beaches in on June 6, 1944.

Actors from the Wavy Navy 'living history' group demonstrated gun drills and played the part of naval officers (pictured) including an admiral, engineering officer, midshipman, seaman and even a war correspondent.

Artefacts from the ship's involvement in D-Day were on display and newsreels were shown during the week of remembrance activities marking the 64th anniversary of the Allied invasion that led to the wartime liberation of Occupied Europe.

HMS Belfast, the last remaining armoured warship from the Second World War remaining in Europe, provided gunfire to give troops cover as they landed at Gold and Juno beaches in Normandy.

The invasion was the largest amphibious operation in military history which marked the turning point in the war against Nazi Germany.

It involved 7,000 ships and 11,000 aircraft. Some 75,000 British and Canadian troops and 57,500 American troops were landed by sea on D-Day. Another 23,000 were landed by air.


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