Search

July 7 bombings five years on: Royal London doctor shares her story

PUBLISHED: 16:01 08 July 2010 | UPDATED: 16:14 05 October 2010

Dr Anne Weaver who led the rescue teams from the Royal London

Dr Anne Weaver who led the rescue teams from the Royal London

ON July 7 2005 when four suicide bombers attacked the capital, the Royal London Hospital went on high alert. Reports of a fire at Aldgate station came into London s biggest trauma centre at around 9am while senior doctors and nurses were gathering for a

ON July 7 2005 when four suicide bombers attacked the capital, the Royal London Hospital went on high alert.

Reports of a fire at Aldgate station came into London's biggest trauma centre at around 9am while senior doctors and nurses were gathering for a teaching day.

As the immensity of the attack unfolded, with more than 700 people injured, a major incident was declared in the hospital.

Dr Anne Weaver co-ordinated the medical teams, sending some out in rapid-response vehicles to Aldgate station and others in the air ambulance helicopter to King's Cross and Edgware Road stations as well as to Tavistock Square where the double-decker bus had exploded.

She said: "There were lots of calls coming through but it was about trying to make sure everybody got the fastest possible care. There were 400 people just at Aldgate station and 200 needing to get to hospital. We couldn't rely on our mobile phones as the network was down."

Once all the teams were out, Dr Weaver arrived at King's Cross station where survivors were still needing treatment.

The 38-year-old said: "It was bizarrely quiet when we got there. There was no traffic on the road as it had been closed and the station had been evacuated.

"I was treating a man who had: a bad leg injury but I was able to talk to him and tell him what I was doing.

"There was a great camaraderie. Everybody was trying to help. Shops were offering drinks and people who knew first aid were treating others who were bleeding. Everybody just clicked into automatic mode."

Back at the hospital, the staff met to discuss the events of the morning and what could have been done differently.

Dr Weaver added: " I just felt disbelief that this had happened on my doorstep and so many innocent people had been injured on their way to work.

"As a doctor, July 5 was something that you train for but hope you will never have to use. But we all felt that we gave the patients the best possible care and I was proud of the hospital.


If you value what this story gives you, please consider supporting the East London Advertiser. Click the link in the orange box below for details.

Become a supporter

This newspaper has been a central part of community life for many years, through good times and bad, serving as your advocate and trusted source of local information. Our industry is facing testing times, which is why I’m asking for your support. Every single contribution will help us continue to produce award-winning local journalism that makes a measurable difference to our community.

Thank you.

Most Read

Most Read

Latest from the East London Advertiser