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Neighbours’ cheer as council revokes nightclub license for violent disorder

PUBLISHED: 01:44 01 November 2008 | UPDATED: 13:44 05 October 2010

A NIGHTCLUB has had its license revoked in London’s East End following complaints from families and police about violent disorder. Club E3 in Mile End lost its permit at Tower Hamlets Council’s licensing committee, after protests about noise and anti-social behaviour

Mike Brooke

A NIGHTCLUB has had its license revoked in London’s East End following complaints from families and police about violent disorder.

Club E3 in Mile End lost its permit at Tower Hamlets Council’s licensing sub-committee.

The club in Mile End Road had already had its license suspended, following an application by the Met Police.

This time, the ban was made permanent after the committee heard from neighbouring residents about noise and disorder.

The authority was handed a petition with 53 signatures by Eaton Terrace Residents’ association.

Residents had also written letters of objection, citing late night noise beyond the hours of the club’s license, anti-social behaviour, crime and disorder and litter.

One couple wrote: “It is exhausting and frustrating to be repeatedly woken at weekends at 3am.” Those leaving the club were often drunk “shouting, turning on car radios at high volume, having fights, screaming, slamming doors” as well as revving their car engines and eventually driving away on screaming tires.

Other neighbours complained of public nuisance caused by clubbers vomiting, urinating and dropping food wrappers, flyers and other debris in the street.

One householder noted how “much better” the quality of life had been since the club license had been suspended.

Tower Hamlets council’s CCTV team produced a 30-minute compilation of footage of incidents outside the E3 club over August and September which was shown to councilors.

“The footage spoke volumes,” said the council’s Community Safety operations manager Heather Mallinder.

“The strength of feeling has obviously been running high among neighbours.

“This club has not been run in a responsible manner, resulting in crime and disorder in the area.”

She added: “Revoking the club’s license has delighted those whose lives have been made a misery by it.”

There were cheers from the public seats at the Town Hall meeting.

The authority issued a stern warning this week that it expects premises which stay open until 4am to meet high standards and ensure their business is “run in a way that does not disturb their neighbours.”

Club E3 had failed to do that—and paid the price by having its license revoked.


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