New police chief at Tower Hamlets promises to treat knife and drug suspects ‘as human beings’

Marcus Barnett... the Met's new borough commander for Tower Hamlets and Hackney. Picture: Mike Brook

Marcus Barnett... the Met's new borough commander for Tower Hamlets and Hackney. Picture: Mike Brooke - Credit: Mike Brooke

Police are to continue their tough stand on stop and search in the fight against drugs and knife crime on the streets, the Met’s new joint borough commander for Tower Hamlets and Hackney has promised.

But Det Chief Supt Marcus Barnett, who took up his post on Monday, has also pledged to treat people "with dignity and respect as human beings" after reports that the East London Advertiser put to him about heavy-handed tactics.

"I support stop and search as a powerful and essential policing tool," he tells the paper in his first media interview since his appointment.

"But it needs to be proportionate, effective and well-evidenced.

"We will stop and search anyone we suspect is carrying a weapon - where we know there's a strong likelihood of violence - if we believe they are carrying knives or guns. But only if we genuinely suspect someone is carrying a weapon."

Marcus Barnett... aiming to make the streets safer in the East End. Picture: Mike Brooke

Marcus Barnett... aiming to make the streets safer in the East End. Picture: Mike Brooke - Credit: Mike Brooke


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Yet the new commander has taken on a tough patch where police have come under fire for rough handling tactics in seemingly minor incidents.

A driver stopped on double yellow lines in Poplar last month was wrestled to the ground by three officers, which was recorded by a passer-by that went viral on social media and has since been referred to the professional standards authorities.

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"I can't talk about what happened in Abbotts Road in much detail," Det Ch Supt Barnett insists. "It's difficult commenting on something that's being formally investigated."

But it hasn't been an isolated "rough handling" arrest over the years.

Det Chief Supt Barnett at his command office in Bethnal Green. Picture: Mike Brooke

Det Chief Supt Barnett at his command office in Bethnal Green. Picture: Mike Brooke - Credit: Mike Brooke

A 13-year-old girl was headlocked in 2017 over a playground argument she'd had outside Wapping High School.

A youth worker in Stepney was put in a headlock by officers that same year who thought he might be a suspect, then charged him with resisting arrest when he protested his innocence. It led to a protest rally in Whitechapel where the mayor slammed the Met Police for heavy-handed tactics. Magistrates threw out the case in minutes.

"I'm happy talking to the community where there have been allegations of police being racist or heavy handed," Det Ch Supt Barnett promises.

"What I expect when I talk to my staff is working with the community. That is absolutely fundamental to me. Otherwise it means being disconnected, ineffective and dysfunctional - which is not professional."

Borough commander Marcus Barnett... "I want to treat people with dignity and respect as human beings

Borough commander Marcus Barnett... "I want to treat people with dignity and respect as human beings, as we would like to be treated ourselves." Picture: Mike Brooke - Credit: Mike Brooke

He aims to make policing "personal" and explains: "I want to provide response that treats people with dignity and respect as human beings, as we would like to be treated ourselves, like my family would like to be treated."

But he also faces a foremost challenge of rampaging drug dealing on the streets and having to turn to local authority street cameras.

"We cannot do this alone," he admits. "Our relationship with the two local authorities is absolutely crucial for me to have access to their CCTV.

"I don't think it's being too cosy with local councils to share resources. We are politically neutral. Our business is about policing."

Tower Hamlets also pays for 39 extra Pcs, while talks have been under way with Hackney Council, which were started by his predecessor, over the same funding issue.

Det Ch Supt Barnett joined the Met in 1993 as a bobby on the beat in the busy West End patch around Soho and Mayfair, before joining the CID for the rest of his 26-year police career.

He took part in under-cover operations when the West End was Europe's largest crack market.

Tackling east London's street drugs menace offers nothing new to this well-seasoned operator. But his undercover experience has turned nowadays to electronic surveillance using council CCTV to catch street drug deals and alerting nearby patrol cars.

The father of two grown-up sons commutes into Liverpool Street each day from East Anglia before he gets his feet under the table in his second-floor command suite at Bethnal Green police station, but loves the long journey which gives him thinking time.

It's a tough call covering the entire command area from Wapping and the Isle of Dogs in the south, to Clapton and Finsbury Park in the north.

Its geographical epicentre ironically is Boundary Street in Shoreditch, once the boundary between two quite separate Met Police divisions before Tower Hamlets and Hackney joined forces in October for policing "fit for the 21st century".

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