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Gazette letters: Donald Trump and Bethnal Green Tube disaster

PUBLISHED: 08:00 27 January 2018

President Donald Trump. Picture: PA IMAGES

President Donald Trump. Picture: PA IMAGES

UPI/PA Images

Letters, contributions and comments sent in to the Advertiser this week.

Trump should be respected

Richard Peres, full address supplied, writes:

I was disgusted to read Tower Hamlets Council showboating and demanding that the invitation to President Donald Trump to visit London is withdrawn.

Aside from the ridiculous egotistic overreach implicit in this idiotic motion (damaging one of our most important relationships with an economically booming trading partner, especially post Brexit) their narrow minded prejudice and foul anti-American hatred is laid bare for all to see.

Tens of millions of Americans chose Donald Trump and it’s time they and he were paid proper respect.

Apparently there is a bottomless pit of bigotry, stupidity and race-baiting on the left.

I suspect we have another seven years of screeching that the establishment candidate lost.

There were no protests when Obama’s government ran out of bombs because he’d dropped so many in the Middle East nor when Clinton went on tour personally selling cluster bombs.

The majority of ordinary people in Britain are sick and tired of the endless hypocrisy and foul temper of left wing showboaters.

It has to stop.

Bethnal Green tube disaster

Rick Fountain, Bromley, Kent, writes:

Your correspondent Joy Puritz says that people who want a government apology for the 1943 Bethnal Green Tube Shelter tragedy “have been misled” and that there was no single body to blame.

Certainly, the local council of that time, the Metropolitan Borough of Bethnal Green, which managed the shelter was not to blame.

It asked four times for safety improvements but was refused. Work started on a longer safer approach to the entrance on the day after the disaster.

When a judge in the Kings Bench division started hearing bereavement claims a year later he allowed the evidence to be heard in secret and local councillors were silenced with threat of jail under the 1911 Official Secrets Act. They were then pronounced to have been negligent in allowing the staircase to be dangerous. The 173 victims, mostly women and children had “panicked”.

Censorship allowed that wartime government to get away with it but slowly the truth seeps out.


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