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Another skyscraper planned at 62 storeys with 600 more homes to add to jam-packed Canary Wharf

PUBLISHED: 16:23 16 October 2020

More development coming to Canary Wharf adding pressure to public services. Picture: Chris Katis

More development coming to Canary Wharf adding pressure to public services. Picture: Chris Katis

Archant

Plans for another residential skyscraper adding 600 more flats to the already-densely populated Canary Wharf district have been sent to Tower Hamlets Council for planning permission.

Ensign House next to the DLR at South Quay where new 62-storey tower is proposed. Picture: GoogleEnsign House next to the DLR at South Quay where new 62-storey tower is proposed. Picture: Google

The 62-storey tower would be among the tallest in the country, a 700ft high structure on the Millwall Dock quayside at Marsh Wall.

It would be the fourth highest in Docklands after the iconic One Canada Square office block, the new Landmark Pinnacle residential tower and the near-completed Newfoundland development, all just a few feet higher.

The £250 million scheme by Maccreanor Lavington developers would replace the six-storey Ensign House built in 1987 after its backers, Far East Consortium in Hong Kong, bought the site in February for £28m, Architects Journal reports.

The tower is among a new wave of high-rise housing developments at South Quay which have been a long-term issue with the Isle of Dogs Planning Forum that fears over-development.

New Neighbourhood Plan for Isle of Dogs going to public referendum in 2021 to control devlopment without infrastructure. Picture: Mike BrookeNew Neighbourhood Plan for Isle of Dogs going to public referendum in 2021 to control devlopment without infrastructure. Picture: Mike Brooke

The main concern was always that hugely dense residential schemes were approved in the past without any strategy to upgrade public services first, to support them—such as roads, public transport, schools, surgeries, mains supplies and sewers.

The forum supports new housing and Isle of Dogs redevelopment, provided sufficient infrastructure is put in place before the first new residents move in.

Rules have since changed with the local authority having introduced a planning levy in February to offset the impact of major developments on neighbourhoods, in addition to the surcharge developers pay anyway towards public services.

Tower Hamlets nowadays has a policy of refusing massive developments without infrastructure funding.

Bold plans for yet another skyscraper at Canary Wharf adding 600 more homes. Picture: Chris KatisBold plans for yet another skyscraper at Canary Wharf adding 600 more homes. Picture: Chris Katis

It had refused the controversial Westferry scheme on the Millwall waterfront—but that just escaped the new levy in time and the council found itself overruled by the secretary of state which led to a row in the Commons earlier this year.

A public referendum is due on the Isle of Dogs next May on its Neighbourhood Plan put forward by the Planning Forum which would put a check on all future Isle of Dogs developments without cash up front for public services to cope with the population increase.

Meanwhile, construction is nearly complete on the two-tower Wardian complex close by which has been built for Eco World-Ballymore.

Another developer, Galliard’s, has launched its massive Millharbour Village revised scheme this year which had previously been refused because of the lack of adequate supporting infrastructure.


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