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Jewish protest in Parliament Square over Jeremy Corbyn's 2012 support for Brick Lane 'anti-Semitic mural' artist

PUBLISHED: 10:46 27 March 2018 | UPDATED: 14:54 27 March 2018

Tory cllr Peter Golds at Parliament Square demo interviewed for TV about anti-Semitism in the Labour Party. Picture: Matthew Vaughan

Tory cllr Peter Golds at Parliament Square demo interviewed for TV about anti-Semitism in the Labour Party. Picture: Matthew Vaughan

Matthew Vaughan

The Tower Hamlets councillor who first exposed the racist Brick Lane mural six years ago at the centre of the current row over anti-Semitism in the national Labour Party was among protesters at last night’s demo outside Parliament against Jeremy Corbyn.

Anti-Semitic Brick Lane mural depicting grotesque imagery by artist 'Meah One' on a wall in Hanbury Street in 2012 before Tower Hamlets Council had it removed. Picture: Peter GoldsAnti-Semitic Brick Lane mural depicting grotesque imagery by artist 'Meah One' on a wall in Hanbury Street in 2012 before Tower Hamlets Council had it removed. Picture: Peter Golds

Conservative group leader Peter Golds was among sympathisers condemning Mr Corbyn’s Facebook support for the artist who painted the mural depicting grotesque caricatures of Jewish ‘bankers’ playing monopoly.

Demonstrators chanting “enough is enough” also criticised his “lack of action” in tackling anti-Semitic rhetoric by some Labour MPs on Facebook and Twitter.

Cllr Golds contacted the paper in 2012 when he first spotted the Brick Lane mural and took a snapshot.

“I sent the picture to Mayor Lutfur Rahman who immediately ordered it to be removed,” he told the East London Advertiser. “But it’s taken Corbyn six years to admit something was wrong.”

Many non-Jews joined last night’s protest to show solidarity, including Communities Secretary Sajid Javid and several Labour MPs.

Mr Corbyn wrote to Jewish community leaders apologising for the “pain and hurt” caused by anti-Semitism in his party. He also apologised for questioning the removal of the mural with a Facebook comment in 2012 telling the artist he was “in good company” among artists who had their work removed.

But protest organisers yesterday accused him of insincerity and being ideologically fixed to “a far-left world view instinctively hostile to mainstream Jewish communities”.

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