Search

Remembering the millions murdered in Hitler’s Holocaust

PUBLISHED: 09:49 21 January 2009 | UPDATED: 13:58 05 October 2010

The Auschwitz Gate, as seen in Verdict On Auschwitz, a First Run Features Release. Over the caurse of 900 days - from the beginning of 
1942 until November 1944 - approximately 600 special transports arrived at the death camp via the German National Railway.

The Auschwitz Gate, as seen in Verdict On Auschwitz, a First Run Features Release. Over the caurse of 900 days - from the beginning of 1942 until November 1944 - approximately 600 special transports arrived at the death camp via the German National Railway.

THE millions who died during the Holocaust of the Second World War are being remembered in a week of events in London from Sunday. Holocaust Memorial Day on Tuesday (Jan-27) is the 64th anniversary of the Allied liberation of the Nazi death camp at Auschwitz-Berkenau in Occupied Poland

By Ollie Eckersley and Mile Brooke

THE millions who died during the Holocaust of the Second World War are being remembered in a week of events in London from Sunday.

Holocaust Memorial Day on Tuesday (Jan-27) is the 64th anniversary of the Allied liberation of the Nazi death camp at Auschwitz-Birkenau in Occupied Poland, where a million Jews and 200,000 others were murdered in gas chambers by the Nazis.

It was part of Hitler’s ethnic cleansing’ of Occupied Europe in which six million Jewish men, women and children—a third of their numbers in the world—were exterminated.

GATHERING DEATH STORM

A series of events in East London organised by the Jewish East End Celebration Society begins with Sunday morning’s walking tour which includes the scene of the Battle of Cable Street’, when Mosley’s fascists were blocked by East Enders preventing his Blackshirts marching through Whitechapel in 1936 as the storm clouds gathered for the coming Holocaust. The walk led by local historian Clive Bettington meets outside Aldgate Underground station at 10.30am.

It is followed by a film screening of The Relief of Belsen at Mile End’s Genesis cinema, near Stepney Green, at 1.30pm, about the liberation of the Bergen-Belsen death camp by British troops in 1945.

Also on Sunday, an interfaith commemoration of the Belsen liberation begins at the East London Central Synagogue in Nelson Street, Stepney, at 4pm, addressed by Marton Braun from Hackney whose family were Holocaust survivors.

Other events in the week include a Holocaust Day gathering at Bethnal Green’s Oxford House community centre in Derbyshire Street, off Bethnal Green Road, at 7pm on Tuesday, with the Searchlight campaign against racism and the renowned 43 Group’ set up at the end of the war to monitor the rebirth of fascism.

SIX MILLION MURDERED

The evening includes candle-lighting to remember the six million Jews and other minorities put to death during the Holocaust.

A Yiddisher Kunst exhibition of Jewish art showing the vibrant life of communities before the Holocaust by pre-War East European artists is being staged at Tower Hamlets Town Hall in Blackwall, Whitechapel’s Brady art centre in Hanbury Street, the Soanes Centre at Tower Hamlets Cemetery Park in Southern Grove, Mile End, and the Whitechapel Ideas Store library centre in Whitechapel Road, running until next Thursday.

Full details are on the JEECS website and Tower Hamlets’ Interfaith website.

+++

SURVIVOR TELLS HIS STORY

Holocaust survivor Henry Glaze, now 84 and living in retirement in Mile End, gave his story at last year’s commemoration.

He was one of the last Jewish children to escape Hitler’s Third Reich on the day German forces invaded Poland in September, 1939, which sparked the Second World War. He was 15 when he was sent on the Kindertransporte scheme organised in London to get Jewish children out, arriving at the Danish frontier just five hours before hostilities broke out on September 1.

“It was very tense that day the fighting began,” Henry remembers. “But my brother and parents were trapped in Kiel and ended up in the death camps.

“I never saw them again. My father died at Auschwitz, my mother at Belsec.”

Britain allowed 40,000 Jewish refugees into the country by the outbreak of war. Of special importance to Henry was the British Government’s decision to admit 10,000 children. He was one of them.


If you value what this story gives you, please consider supporting the East London Advertiser. Click the link in the yellow box below for details.

Become a supporter

This newspaper has been a central part of community life for many years, through good times and bad. Coronavirus is one of the greatest challenges our community has ever faced, but if we all play our part we will defeat it. We're here to serve as your advocate and trusted source of local information.

In these testing times, your support is more important than ever. Thank you.

Most Read

Most Read

Latest from the East London Advertiser