Split water and we’ll have cheap power, says boffin

NOBEL prizewinner Sir Harold Kroto—the man who discovered carbon chains in space—is putting his money on micro’ science to help sustain the planet. He suggested splitting water molecules would be a sustainable way of creating energy, when he delivered a lecture at Queen Mary college in East London

By Anastasia Aboim

NOBEL prizewinner Sir Harold Kroto—the man who discovered carbon chains in space—is putting his money on micro’ science to help sustain the planet.

Atom-sized engineering, or nanotechnology, can be used to find safer energies to tackle the Earth’s climate change, he told an audience in East London.

He suggested splitting water molecules would be a cheap and sustainable way of creating energy, when he delivered a lecture at London University’s Queen Mary college in Mile End.


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Sir Harold is credited with discovering carbon chains in space which earned him the Nobel Prize.

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The carbon chains could also be used in the production process for making cheaper solar panels for electricity, he adds.

Nanotechnology was one of the key elements of his lecture on the role of science in education today.

Sir Harold believes in teaching science as a priority at school and getting children involved in internet education.

He is part of the Vega science outreach organisation that holds workshops all over the world for youngsters.

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