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Suchet accepts cash for RNLI after learning they rescued his ancestor

PUBLISHED: 12:36 31 December 2008 | UPDATED: 13:55 05 October 2010

Suchet (inset) and the Tower Lifeboat crew

Suchet (inset) and the Tower Lifeboat crew

ACTOR David Suchet accepted a donation for the RNLI at the Tower of London after discovering his great-great grandfather had been rescued by them. He accepted the cheque on behalf of the organisation from the Yeoman Warders at The Tower

By Mike Brooke

ACTOR David Suchet accepted a donation for the Royal National Lifeboat Institution at the Tower of London after discovering his great-great grandfather had been rescued by them.

Suchet, best known for his role as the Belgian detective Hercule Poirot who also received an International Emmy for his portrayal of newspaper magnate Robert Maxwell, collected a donation from the Yeoman Warders’ Club.

The Yeoman Warders, who have been responsible for security at The Tower since 1485, run a charity which this year is supporting the RNLI among others with £1,000 towards crew training at Tower Lifeboat station.

Suchet, who discovered his ancestor had been rescued by a lifeboat on the East Coast when he took part in the BBC’s Who Do You Think You Are? celebrity genealogy show, accepted the cheque on behalf of the organisation from the Yeoman Warders at a reception at The Tower.

Yeoman Bill Callaghan, who is also a Tower Lifeboat volunteer lifeboat crewman, said: “When anyone finds out there’s a personal link in their ancestry it reinforces their regard for the work of lifeboat crews in London and around the coast.

“Suchet discovered his great-great-grandfather was rescued off the Suffolk coast by a fisherman who was also coxswain of the RNLI Southwold lifeboat.”

Not many lifeboat stations, however, are able to boast they have someone in their crew who is also responsible for the Crown Jewels.

Nowhere is this more true than on the Thames, where volunteers come from all walks of life, including yeomen from The Tower who trace their own origins back to 1078 when William the Conqueror employed soldiers to guard the White Tower.

Today, everything is put aside for the sole aim of saving lives on the Thames—even the Crown Jewels.


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