Super yachts, dutch tall ships and Danish Royal Family dock at Canary Wharf for London Olympics

Multi-million dollar yachts owned by the super rich and tall sailing ships are lining Canary Wharf for the London Olympics.

Most of the fourteen vessels, due to arrive before tonight’s opening ceremony, including two cruise liners, two sailing ships and 10 private yachts have moored at South Quay.

With rooftop Jacuzzis, swimming pools and blacked out windows the biggest of the yachts gracing the aptly named Dollar Bay belongs to Microsoft co-founder Paul Allen, ranked the world’s 48th richest man with a fortune of $14.2 billion.

Valued at more than $200 million the Octopus, said to be the world’s 12th largest super yacht, comes with two helicopters, a submarine, and a swimming pool that converts into a dance floor and a professional recording studio.

Sitting along the dock is also Ilona, a 74-metre giant complete with a helicopter pad and two fold-away beaches, owned by Westfield shopping mall group founder Frank Lowy.


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And with daily moorings costing from �3,000 to �9,000 during the Olympics, Fran Read, a spokeswoman for the Canal and River Trust overseeing the waterways, said the income will help the new charity, which recently took over from British Waterways.

She said “West India Dock has turned into a Cockney Monaco. It’s a great atmosphere and really exciting. The sun has been out and Canary Wharf workers are coming out to admire the vessels and take photos.

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“We hope it’s a sign of things to come with more boats choosing to come here.”

Two Dutch tall ships, The Stad Amsterdam and Eendracht, also give a sense of what the docks must have been like in their trading heydays.

And it was a right royal sparkle as the Danish monarchy sailed in with their Royal Yacht, Dannebrog last week.

Queen Margrethe of Denmark was due to help launch an exhibition showcasing Danish culture and products at the St. Katharine Docks, near Tower Bridge last Friday, running until August 12.

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