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Survivor Henry lights candle to six million Holocaust dead

PUBLISHED: 13:34 28 January 2009 | UPDATED: 13:59 05 October 2010

Henry... lighting one of seven candles for the Holocaust dead

Henry... lighting one of seven candles for the Holocaust dead

Olivia Harris, oliviaharris@mac.com 07881 810 878

HENRY Glanz lights one of seven candles to remember the millions who died in Nazi death camps during the Second World War as part of yesterday’s Holocaust Memorial Day. It had personal meaning for the 84-year-old, whose parents and brother were among six million Jews and a million others put to death in the camps of Occupied Europe. He was one of seven guests lighting memorial candles at one event in East London last night

By Mike Brooke

HENRY Glanz lights one of seven candles to remember the millions who died in the Nazi death camps during the Second World War as part of yesterday’s Holocaust Memorial Day.

The annual commemoration had personal meaning for the 84-year-old, whose parents and brother were among the six million Jews and a million others put to death in the camps across Occupied Europe.

He was one of seven guests lighting memorial candles at one event in East London last night (Tues) on the 64th anniversary of the liberation of Auschwitz death camp, which followed a weekend of commemorations staged in London’s East End and across Britain.

The others lighting candles included Tower Hamlets council deputy leader Siraj Islam, veteran anti-fascist campaigner Gerry Gable and 19-year-old dance student Amy Kingsworth from Wapping.

Henry himself was on the last Kindertransporte evacuation when he was 15 which brought 10,000 Jewish children out of Hitler’s Germany to Britain when war began.

He crossed the border into Denmark just hours before German forces invaded Poland on September 1, 1939.

But his family were still trapped in Kiel—he never saw them again.

He returned to Kiel for the first time in October, where three stone plaques had been unveiled in the pavement outside where their house once stood, he told last night’s audience.

Henry, now living in retirement in East London, recited the kuddish’ prayer for the dead before lighting his candle.

Holocaust Memorial Day marks the Auschwitz-Birkenau liberation in January, 1945, and other 20th century genocides since.


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