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Tragic Vicky’s life not in vain as her organs help save seven others

PUBLISHED: 23:04 26 January 2009 | UPDATED: 13:59 05 October 2010

Dave Green story



As promised to David green, to accompany his story re: Vicky Johnson.

Vicki Johnson from Stradbroke who died followijng a collision with a car crossing a road in London

Picture contributed by Jennifer Johnson 24/1/09



EADT 26.1.09

Dave Green story As promised to David green, to accompany his story re: Vicky Johnson. Vicki Johnson from Stradbroke who died followijng a collision with a car crossing a road in London Picture contributed by Jennifer Johnson 24/1/09 EADT 26.1.09

THE tragic death of 23-year-old Vicky Johnson has helped save or improve the lives of seven other people—including a one-year-old baby girl given just two days to live. Vicky had registered as an organ donor, which has resulted in transplants of her heart, liver, kidneys and pancreas following her death after a road accident on the busy A11 in East London earlier this month

THE tragic death of 23-year-old Vicky Johnson has helped save or improve the lives of seven other people—including a one-year-old baby girl given just two days to live.

Vicky had registered as an organ donor, which has resulted in transplants of her heart, liver, kidneys and pancreas.

The trainee barrister died following a road accident on the busy A11 in East London, at the traffic light crossing outside Mile End Underground station, earlier this month.

Now her wishes about donating her organs have inspired her family to register as donors as well.

Her schoolteacher mum Jennifer Johnson had reservations at first.

“You hear many stories about people coming out of a coma after doctors had given up hope,” she said.

“Vicky was given every chance, but we were told it would not be possible to recover from her injuries. She was brain dead.”

Her fears about organ donation were overcome by medical staff at the Royal London Hospital in Whitechapel, where Vicky died.

“Vicky thought about life after death at an age when most people would not give it a thought,” her 53-year-old mum added. “Now we want greater awareness of organ donation to be part of her legacy.”

Vicky’s dad David, 54, a village postmaster in Norfolk where she grew up, had carried a donor card at various times in his life, but never registered.

Her older sister Katy, 26, said the family were comforted by the tragedy bringing hope to so many waiting for transplants.

“I heard Vicky’s liver had helped save a baby girl and I grasped onto that with both hands,” Katy said.

“We have tremendous solace knowing Vicky has been able to help others after her death.”

Patients helped by Vicky’s organs include the 12-month-old baby and a woman in her 50s both receiving liver transplants, a woman in her 60s receiving her heart, a woman in her 50s her lungs, a man in his 30s her pancreas and a woman in her 30s and another in her 40s getting her kidneys.


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