Search

Volunteers give Mile End Park's biodiversity a 'tree-mendous' boost

PUBLISHED: 10:00 05 December 2019

Getting ready to plant a sapling on Haverfield Green at the top end of Mile End Park. Picture: LBTH

Getting ready to plant a sapling on Haverfield Green at the top end of Mile End Park. Picture: LBTH

LBTH

Volunteers went wild planting wild trees to help make the planet greener—or at least make a corner of Bethnal Green greener.

First of the new saplings... improving the woodland trail next to the Regent's Canal. Picture: LBTHFirst of the new saplings... improving the woodland trail next to the Regent's Canal. Picture: LBTH

They turned up for the Woodland Trust's "big climate fightback" at the north end of Mile End Park, by the Regent's Canal, rooting deciduous and evergreen species into the soil at Haverfield Green to improve the woodland trail.

The tree planting event put on by Tower Hamlets Council was aimed at creating a continuous canopy cover from one end of Mile End Park to the other.

"It's essential that we keep parklands replenished with new trees," The council's head of parks Stephen Murray explained. "This is a crucial climate change project—our parks are a jewel in the crown."

A job well done... enthusiastic volunteers who planted new trees to help parkland biodiversity in the East End. Picture: LBTHA job well done... enthusiastic volunteers who planted new trees to help parkland biodiversity in the East End. Picture: LBTH

The variety of species the volunteers planted like wild cherry and wild service also included common alder, beech, silver birch, bird cherry, hazel, hornbeam, lime, Scots pine and yew.

It replicates native species in a typical British woodland, which helps improve natural biodiversity and teaches fans of the planet about different species and the importance of trees.

Most Read

Most Read

Latest from the East London Advertiser

Hot Jobs

Show Job Lists