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TV stalwarts back together for Jewish history tales

PUBLISHED: 19:58 02 June 2008 | UPDATED: 13:20 05 October 2010

Oh Boy! Jack Good and Dibley's 'Jim Trott' Trevor Peacock

Oh Boy! Jack Good and Dibley's 'Jim Trott' Trevor Peacock

ACTOR Trevor Peacock, better known these days for his role as bumbling Jim Trott’ in the popular BBC comedy Vicar of Dibley, was a familiar face in London’s East End when he was starting out. He joined his old pal Jack Good, producer of the pioneering 1950s pop shows 'Six Five Special' and 'Oh Boy!' to share stories about the time they lived at Toynbee Hall and delivered meals on wheels to the elderly in Whitechapel. The pair were recording their memories for a TV programme, 'My Jewish London,' with stories from well-known names from the Jewish community.

By Julia Gregory

ACTOR Trevor Peacock is better known these days for his role as bumbling 'Jim Trott' in the popular BBC comedy Vicar of Dibley.

But he was a familiar face in London's East End when he was starting out.

Trevor joined his old pal Jack Good, the producer of the pioneering 1950s pop shows Six Five Special and Oh Boy! to share stories about the time when they lived at Toynbee Hall and delivered meals on wheels to the elderly in Whitechapel.

The pair were recording their memories for a television programme called My Jewish London which is featuring stories from many well-known names from the capital's Jewish community.

Producer Peter Harrison said: "The two of them wanted to get started in London and lived at Toynbee Hall where they helped deliver meals on wheels to pensioners living nearby.

"Jack fell in love with the assistant caterer there, and they married."

Trevor and Jack found many changes to the East End when they returned this week for filming for the documentary.

It was the first time the two had visited Toynbee Hall since they rented rooms at the settlement at £3 a week in the 1950s, almost a fortune back then. They will be on the guest list for Toynbee's 125th anniversary next year.

Jack made his name with the ground-breaking rock n' roll show Six Five Special, the first TV show aimed at Britain's emerging post-War teenagers. Early guests included Tommy Steele, Shirley Bassey and bandleader Humphrey Lyttleton.

He later moved to America where he acted with Cary Grant in the movie Father Goose before producing the musical Elvis.

Trevor penned the song Mrs Brown, You've Got a Lovely Daughter which knocked Elvis Presley off the top slot in the US charts.

During his theatrical career, he has trodden the boards at the National Theatre and is now known to TV audiences at the stuttering parishioner in the Vicar of Dibley which stars Dawn French.

My Jewish London is likely to be screened at the Jewish Film Festival in Atlanta and on US and British television.


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