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You couldn’t see Tower Bridge for Marathon runners!

PUBLISHED: 22:20 28 April 2009 | UPDATED: 14:19 05 October 2010

Streaming across the bridge (top) and through Canary Wharf (above)

Streaming across the bridge (top) and through Canary Wharf (above)

FANCY dress and charity runners joined professional athletes for the 26.2-mile London Marathon snaking its way across Tower Bridge. The sun came out for the tens-of-thousands taking part in the 28th London Marathon

By Else Kvist

FANCY dress and charity runners joined professional athletes as they tackled the 26.2-mile London Marathon snaking its way across the iconic Tower Bridge, passing the Tower of London.

The sun came out for the tens-of-thousands of runners taking part in the 28th London Marathon.

Elite men and women were followed by a crowd of 35,000 runners en route from Greenwich and Blackheath in south-east London, over Tower Bridge, through Docklands to Canary Wharf, around the Isle of Dogs, then back through the East End and the City, along the Thames embankment to finish 26 miles later in The Mall, opposite Buckingham Palace.

Firefighters on duty in East London appropriately turned Millwall fire-station, which was on the Isle of Dogs section of the route, into a water station’ for thirsty runners.

But nearby Barkantine birth centre was closed. Expectant mums were sent to the Royal London Hospital instead.

The centre wasn’t risking mums going into labour and not being able to get through the thousands of runners and spectators.

Kenya’s Sammy Wanjiru won the men’s race with a record 2hrs, 5mins, 10secs.

Britain’s Mara Yamauchi romped home runner-up in the women’s race, just 61 seconds behind reigning champ Irina Mikitenko from Germany who crossed the line in 2hrs, 22mins, 11secs.

Australian Kurt Fearnley won the men’s wheelchair race with Britain’s David Weir a close second.

Waiting to greet them on the finishing line were some of the 2,000 London schoolchildren who had beaten them to The Mall with their own Mini London Marathon’ earlier in the day.


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